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A wonderful world - (For Physics Nerds)

Discussion in 'Creative' started by Cozygung, Nov 2, 2017.

  1. Cozygung

    Cozygung Dank Memeber Staff Member Server Mod

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    Are you implying that we will never be able to "perfectly" model factors such as air resistance? Also, from what you've stated earlier about the uncertainties of nature, are you saying that there won't ever be a time where we can predict the course of nature?
     
    #21
  2. Rick

    Rick Veteran Member Staff Member Server Mod Bronze VIP

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    Yes and yes. It's a fundamental property of QM. You cant 'perfectly' model anything because you cant know it's position and momentum perfectly, that's not even talking about how every interaction in the universe is probabilistic to at least a degree.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uncertainty_principle
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wave_function

    What point are you even trying to make? If you're trying to make the point that space is finite or looped, we can't know that it's infinite but you can measure the curvature of space and measurements seem to show that it's flat. This makes so little sense and you never clearly state what you're talking about so I feel like you're meming.
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2017
    #22
  3. Cozygung

    Cozygung Dank Memeber Staff Member Server Mod

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    Unfortunately, if there are such life forms that were looking at us from billions of light years away, they would only see us from back billions of years ago when the earth was newborn, or maybe not even then.
     
    #23
  4. Cozygung

    Cozygung Dank Memeber Staff Member Server Mod

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    Yep, I know about the wave where you can only determine where it is located at but, not which direction it is moving since waves are particles, yadda yadda yadda.
    I was just wondering whether if they would eventually able to find out the answer to this :p
     
    #24
  5. Rick

    Rick Veteran Member Staff Member Server Mod Bronze VIP

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    Then you don't know because you can know the location and the momentum but not both with 100% accuracy, and it has nothing to do with waves it works the same when you consider them particles.

    That IS the answer. You cant figure it out it's part of QM, they figured it out and that's the answer.


    also pls don't double post merge them
     
    #25
  6. Bayrock

    Bayrock Founder & Developer Staff Member Founder

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    Fortunately, that would only be true if we assume they don't have the technology to travel at the speed of light.
     
    #26
  7. Cozygung

    Cozygung Dank Memeber Staff Member Server Mod

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    So is this "Heisenberg's uncertainty principle"?

    What do you mean by that? Even if you were travelling at light speed, if they were billions of light years away, the name itself defines that it will take billions of years travelling at the speed of light. Thus, if you were looking through a telescope, somewhere, billions of light years away, they would only see the photons that were bounced off that planet billions of years ago.

    For instance, if they were 65 million light years away, they'd see earth from back when dinosaurs existed, since dinosaurs existed 65 millions of years ago. Reference: http://quarksandcoffee.com/index.php/2015/07/08/aliens-and-dinosaurs/
     
    #27
  8. Bayrock

    Bayrock Founder & Developer Staff Member Founder

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    While you're correct that it'd still take ages traveling at the exact speed of light, we can still assume they have access to technology beyond our understanding. Perhaps they can go faster than that, or eliminate the need for traveling at all (warp?).

    Regardless of that ability or not, I think it's cool they could be staring back at the same night sky.
     
    #28
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  9. Cozygung

    Cozygung Dank Memeber Staff Member Server Mod

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    Can someone briefly explain why light can't escape the gravitational field of black holes when it doesn't have any mass? It has to do with momentum but I don't completely get this concept.
     
    #29
  10. Rick

    Rick Veteran Member Staff Member Server Mod Bronze VIP

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    The spacetime inside the event horizon is so curved that even if you travel at the speed of light you still approach the singularity. Don't think of gravity here as a force because you cant really apply that to photons.
     
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  11. Cozygung

    Cozygung Dank Memeber Staff Member Server Mod

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    So how does this affect the "momentum" of the photons when it doesn't even have any mass.
     
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  12. Rick

    Rick Veteran Member Staff Member Server Mod Bronze VIP

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    If you want to know what it means for a photon to 'have momentum' then just think about how a photon is able to impart momentum onto another object. Think like solar sails and stuff like that, if photons didn't have momentum then they wouldn't be able to impart energy in that way.

    If you want a mathematical description.

    E^2 = (mc^2)^2 + (pc)^2 describes the relativistic energy of a particle, for a photon 'm=0' therefore
    E^2 = (pc)^2
     
    #32
  13. Loofy

    Loofy Loneliest Staff Member Server Mod Silver VIP

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    The butterfly effect is an intriguing concept for me
     
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  14. Rick

    Rick Veteran Member Staff Member Server Mod Bronze VIP

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    The butterfly effect isn't even worth thinking about
     
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  15. Loofy

    Loofy Loneliest Staff Member Server Mod Silver VIP

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    it's worth thinking about it now, let see where it takes us rick :smile:
     
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