Library Thread (Post your cool books here)

Discussion in 'Interests' started by Rick, Jun 17, 2019.

  1. Rick

    Rick female nipple Staff Member Community Manager Gold VIP

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    This thread is for books that you've read that have seriously influenced you, and that you'd like others to read. Don't feel inclined to lay it out as I have as I also wanted to talk about shit books I've read recently. (It's basically a book review thread).

    Over the last year I've tried to read a lot more, I've read some shit and I've read some bangers, and after turning the last page of a recent story I've felt an overwhelming urge to share this joyous feeling with others. I'm sure some of you have read something that fills you with a desire to put that book right into somebody's hand. The following are my opinion blah blah blah. These are four of the works that I've read over the last year specifically, but post anything you've ever read that has influenced you.

    The worst:
    [​IMG]
    The disappearing spoon

    I feel as if this one is really rife for somebody who is being introduced to chemistry, it's a sort of bookform for Periodic Videos but done in a "I built this in my backyard" manner. It focuses on stories surrounding the elements, but nothing beyond what you would've heard if you already had a reasonable knowledge of chemistry.

    [​IMG]

    The virgin and the gypsy

    I've tried to read more poetry, and unfortunately I haven't got farther than a Cummings (hehe funny name) collection, but I saw this in a bookshop and thought it'd be interesting to read a novel by a poet. It came across as a very predictable "coming of age"/"coming of sexuality" story with some minor (and probably default in D.H's case as he very plainly reflects the attitudes of the time (apart from the sexual aspects of course)) political commentary.

    The best:

    [​IMG]

    The pearl

    An absolutely beautiful novella, I've been meaning to read grapes of wrath for a long time and when I saw a Steinbeck book for 50p I thought that this was the second best option. Included within are all the classic tropes of a Steinbeck work: Beautiful narration on the environment, a story with a moral compass dating back to the stone age but told in a riveting manner and characters which (compared to of mice and men for example) have very limited dialogue.

    [​IMG]

    The end of eternity

    This is, without a shadow of a doubt, the best book that I have ever read and is what triggered me to create this thread. I've read Asimov for a long old while and this is (IMO) by far the best thing he has written, beyond the foundation series and beyond I-buttfuck. I recommend this book so highly that I will be wholeheartedly willing to subsidize anyone that shows a paypal screenshot of them buying it.

    Thanks for reading, make sure you post ur bookies belowies
     
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  2. Yinzerz

    Yinzerz Professional Yeeter Contributor

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    The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien is probably my favorite book of all time.

    It's probably more applicable to American readers as it goes over the Vietnam War and the narrator's stories from before, during, and after the war. However, O'Brien goes over the topics of what makes reality and lies believable and how lies sometimes convey the truth more than the actual truth.

    O'Brien previously wrote a nonfiction book on the Vietnam War and has said in interviews that his fiction work of The Things They Carried helped convey the true feelings and horror of war better than the truth could ever try to explain.
     
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  3. Yinzerz

    Yinzerz Professional Yeeter Contributor

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    City of Thieves by David Benioff is a modern take on World War II and Russia during the Siege of Leningrad.

    It is a great coming of age story that takes you through the journey of two young Russian soldiers on a mission to acquire eggs. The novel helps show how truly rugged and terrible the life in Leningrad was during this time and takes inspiration from real war tactics to help deliver this message.

    I would say if you like coming of age stories with a historical landscape, this book would be perfect for you.
     
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  4. Sotori

    Sotori Flooderator Inc. Staff Member Admin Platinum VIP

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    When I was younger, I'd be occasionally checking in my local school library for the next volume of "Dragonbreath" by Ursula Vernon. Her stories and fantasy inspired children all around to chase their dreams at such a young age.
     
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